David Wesst // Blog

Automated WebDriver Testing in Edge is Literally Free

Published on March 30th 2017
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Updated on March 30th 2017
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Filed under javascript
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Tagged with edge , browserstack , webdriver , testing

I’m not going to go into much detail as you can get all of that on the original Edge developer post here. What I want to point out, are the reasons why this is pretty awesome.

If you’re not familiar with Selenium WebDriver, it is a testing framework that allows developers to write test scripts that automate user interaction with a web browser. These tests are written once, and can be run in any number of browsers that support WebDriver, which covers the majority of web browsers. You can run them just like regular tests and get results back.

Now that we know that Selenium WebDriver is cool, we can talk about why this announcement is awesome.

No More Excuses for Not Writing Automated Tests

Everyone has excuses for not doing proper automated. Me included.

If you accept that “I don’t have enough time” (which you do, especially in the long run) and “This change is too small need to worry about a test” (which is another way of saying you’re lazy), the most common one I hear is infrastructure cost.

Not all of us have the luxury have having full data centers setup with all the different browsers we need, or have machine that can run multiple VMs at once to test things. Browserstack removes the need for your own infrastructure, let’s you tie it to your own testing code, and doesn’t have a financial cost either. It just lets you test your apps in Edge. Plain and simple.

Try Browserstack Like a Boss

Even if you’re one of those I hate Edge people, you can get something out of this.

I’ve tinkered with Browserstack free accounts and coupons in the past, but didn’t really put my back into it. My reasoning: at some point I’ll have to start paying for the service. It’s not that I don’t think the service is worth it, but it’s one of those things that isn’t all that cheap just to get into. At the time of this writing, you can get into automated testing with Browserstack for about $60 USD per month, if you pay the full year up front.

This deal solves that problem by giving you Edge as a place to get your feet wet with automated testing.

You can run upto 10 concurrent Selenium WebDriver sessions for free. Yeah, it’s not for every browser but it’s for three different versions of Edge, which is defintiely enough to get you started.

I’m in! Now what?

Simple.

Setup a Browserstack account and wire up your tests as documented here. They support Java, NodeJS, C#, Python, along with a few others, and have plugins for many of the big CI (Continuous Integration) build systems like Jenkins and Travis-CI.



Automated WebDriver Testing in Edge is Literally Free


As of today, you can run your Selenium WebDriver tests against Microsoft Edge preview, stable, and n-1 stable versions for free. Literally.

I’m not going to go into much detail as you can get all of that on the original Edge developer post here. What I want to point out, are the reasons why this is pretty awesome.

If you’re not familiar with Selenium WebDriver, it is a testing framework that allows developers to write test scripts that automate user interaction with a web browser. These tests are written once, and can be run in any number of browsers that support WebDriver, which covers the majority of web browsers. You can run them just like regular tests and get results back.

Now that we know that Selenium WebDriver is cool, we can talk about why this announcement is awesome.

No More Excuses for Not Writing Automated Tests

Everyone has excuses for not doing proper automated. Me included.

If you accept that “I don’t have enough time” (which you do, especially in the long run) and “This change is too small need to worry about a test” (which is another way of saying you’re lazy), the most common one I hear is infrastructure cost.

Not all of us have the luxury have having full data centers setup with all the different browsers we need, or have machine that can run multiple VMs at once to test things. Browserstack removes the need for your own infrastructure, let’s you tie it to your own testing code, and doesn’t have a financial cost either. It just lets you test your apps in Edge. Plain and simple.

Try Browserstack Like a Boss

Even if you’re one of those I hate Edge people, you can get something out of this.

I’ve tinkered with Browserstack free accounts and coupons in the past, but didn’t really put my back into it. My reasoning: at some point I’ll have to start paying for the service. It’s not that I don’t think the service is worth it, but it’s one of those things that isn’t all that cheap just to get into. At the time of this writing, you can get into automated testing with Browserstack for about $60 USD per month, if you pay the full year up front.

This deal solves that problem by giving you Edge as a place to get your feet wet with automated testing.

You can run upto 10 concurrent Selenium WebDriver sessions for free. Yeah, it’s not for every browser but it’s for three different versions of Edge, which is defintiely enough to get you started.

I’m in! Now what?

Simple.

Setup a Browserstack account and wire up your tests as documented here. They support Java, NodeJS, C#, Python, along with a few others, and have plugins for many of the big CI (Continuous Integration) build systems like Jenkins and Travis-CI.